Blogging and the Imagined Audience

Blogging and the Imagined Audience

I’ve had a great time engaging in blogging for audience and purpose with my class over the past term and a half. Not least, our communication with NASA Educator Astronaut Barbara Morgan last month. Blogging has proven itself to really bring the world into my classroom and allow the children to engage in meaningful dialogue with an audience that is not necessarily anonymous. Julia Davies (2006: 60) wrote that blogging allows users to share their voice with

Growing Greener Futures

Friday 22nd October 2010 – I slept in, my bag strap broke, my MacBook wouldn’t work, I misplaced my iPad four times, Google Maps wouldn’t work (when I was running a session on it) and I forgot to print out the information sheet for speakers. In terms of conference day problems that isn’t too bad disaster wise. Since July 2010 I have been organising the Growing Greener Futures Conference (#ggfc) as part of my new

Why ‘Growing Greener Futures’ is important

I recently took up a new role in my school as creative learning coordinator, which includes coordinating our School of Creativity programme with Creative Partnerships. Over the past three years we have been engaged in work based on outdoor learning, living with the land and digital technologies. This has included redeveloping areas of our school grounds into new learning spaces and using a new blogging platform to begin to support writing, evaluation and reflection. Our

New Literacy Studies 1 – Is the damage already done?

One of my main areas of interest/despair is the way in which the National Literacy Strategy has led to a narrow conception of what literacy actually is and how it should be taught in schools. I regularly talk about the way the strategy has focused on the acquisition of print-based decoding skills, completely ignoring multimodal analysis/production skills (even speaking and listening), which has in turn led teachers to believe that the idea of ‘schooled-literacy’ is

Hacking popular culture…

I’ve always loved the way that media can be edited, remixed and reinvented with the use of digital technologies. I started doing it myself at a young age (see previous blog post). I noticed how Angela has recently blogged about remixing as a means of transformative story-telling (here). She uses the term hacking popular culture, which I think is a brilliant way to describe the process.