I recently took up a new role in my school as creative learning coordinator, which includes coordinating our School of Creativity programme with Creative Partnerships. Over the past three years we have been engaged in work based on outdoor learning, living with the land and digital technologies. This has included redeveloping areas of our school grounds into new learning spaces and using a new blogging platform to begin to support writing, evaluation and reflection.

Our children have undoubtedly benefited from taking part in the Growing Greener programme, which has included a greater understanding of issues linked to conservation, healthy living and economic well-being. In addition the children have developed critical thinking skills in relation to nature and wildlife in our school grounds and the wider community. The approach has been topic-driven with work seeping into various curriculum areas in a relevant and meaningful way. Children are becoming more engaged with the writing process through the blogging platform, parents are reporting that children want to make healthy and wholesome meals at home and understanding of the world in which we live has improved dramatically.

Gareth Malone’s Extraordinary School of Boys, recently aired on BBC2, portrayed teachers as beings who refused to leave the classroom or think outside the box. This is not the case. Many teachers and educationalists are doing outstanding things liked to outdoor and creative learning. The Growing Greener Futures Conference aims to prove this. It is events like this that prove teachers can think ‘beyond the box’ and explore the curriculum in engaging and meaningful ways with the children whom they teach.

Growing Greener Futures is hosted at Holy Trinity Rosehill Primary School and part-funded by Creative Partnerships. It aims to explore outdoor learning and living with the land through the themes of gardening, conservation, cooking, sustainability and digital technologies. We have secured outstanding and inspirational speakers for the event including Juliet Robertson of Creative STAR Learning Company and the internationally renowned Ollie Bray, National Advisor for Learning and Technology Futures. In addition Andy Black, Bill Lord, Steve Bunce and Jo Liversidge, among many others, will be presenting hands-on and thought provoking workshops based on a creative and outdoor curriculum of excellence.

It promises to be a very exciting and engaging event. Where else can you take part in workshops based on cooking (with a real chef), bushcraft (with a real explorer), gardening (with a real garden expert) and digital technologies (with real technology experts) all at the same conference? Growing Greener Futures is the answer to opening a dialogue for real curriculum change in relation to outdoor and meaningful creative learning.

Places are still available, for more information visit:

http://www.growing-greener.co.uk/conference

2 thoughts on “Why ‘Growing Greener Futures’ is important

  • October 3, 2010 at 5:24 pm
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    I'm really looking forward to being there and meeting all these great people. It promises to be an amazing event.

    Reply
  • October 4, 2010 at 8:00 pm
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    Sounds like an exciting event and must have taken a great deal of organising. Really looking forward to taking part.

    Reply

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